Post-Election Uncertainty: 10 Picture Books by Black Authors That Promote Self-Love and Acceptance

On November 9, 2016, children in America woke up to learn that Donald Trump had been elected President of the United States. According to some, Trump ran one of the most divisive and hate-filled campaigns in history. It is a fact that he unapologetically mocked a disabled reporter, made disparaging remarks about Mexican and Muslim immigrants and members of the military, implied that Black people lived in hell, regularly insulted people on Twitter, and was accused of sexual misconduct by many women.

James Baldwin once said, “Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.” As the presidential campaign progressed, educators reported an increase of bullying in their classrooms which resulted in distress and fear for some children. After the election, about 200incidents of election-related harassment and intimidation [were reported] across the country.” The incidents involved adults and children. As stated in a previous post about bullying, “educators and parents use…literature to spark difficult conversations.” Now, all over the nation, adults are grappling with how to assuage the fears of their children and students during this uncertain time. The picture books listed below promote self-love and acceptance of those who are different. Not only do elementary educators find using picture books in the classroom vital, but some middle and high school educators also find many reasons to use picture books. Hopefully, these books can offer our children some sense of inner resolve to continue to see the goodness and beauty in themselves and others. Peace and Blessings to you all.




You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.

Maya Angelou

My America – Jan Spivey Gilchrist

My America – Jan Spivey Gilchrist
“Have you seen my country? / Seen my magic skies? / Seen my mighty waters? / Have you seen my land?”

Honey, I Love and Other Love Poems – Eloise Greenfield

Honey, I Love and Other Love Poems – Eloise Greenfield
“Love don't mean all that kissing like on television / Love Means Daddy saying keep your mama company till I get back / And me doing it”

Skin Again – bell hooks

Skin Again – bell hooks
“The skin I'm in is just a covering. / It cannot tell my story. / The skin I'm in is just a covering. / If you want to know who I am you have got to come inside and open your heart way wide.”

Black Magic - Dinah Johnson

Black Magic - Dinah Johnson
“My hundred black braids make a spider web around my head, / and Mama’s voice is black and sweet as I fall asleep.”

Let's Talk About Race – Julius Lester

Let's Talk About Race – Julius Lester
“We all have a story beyond the color of our skin.

Wings - Christopher Myers

Wings - Christopher Myers
“Your flying is beautiful.”

Didn't We Have Fun! – Hilda Robinson

Didn't We Have Fun! – Hilda Robinson
“He wore black suits, silk ties, and a Panama hat.”

My Brother Charlie – Holly Robinson & Ryan Elizabeth Peete

My Brother Charlie – Holly Robinson & Ryan Elizabeth Peete
"Charlie’s brain works in a very special way because Charlie has autism. It's harder for him to make friends. Or show his true feelings. Or stay safe.

Brown Honey in Broomwheat Tea – Joyce Carol Thomas

Brown Honey in Broomwheat Tea – Joyce Carol Thomas
"My mother says I am / Brown honey in broomwheat tea / My father calls me the sweetwater / of his days."

God's Dream - Archbishop Desmond Tutu

God's Dream - Archbishop Desmond Tutu
“God dreams that every one of us will see that we are all brothers and sisters—yes, even you and me—even if we have different mommies and daddies or live in different faraway lands.”
Black Children’s Books and Authors DOES NOT review books, the mission of our organization is to promote awareness of Black authors of children’s and young adult literature. Summaries and reviews—for most of the books—can be found by clicking on the links.

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